Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://nopr.niscair.res.in/handle/123456789/1531
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dc.contributor.authorSridhar, K. R.-
dc.contributor.authorMaria, G. L.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-19T10:38:03Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-19T10:38:03Z-
dc.date.issued2006-12-
dc.identifier.issn0379-5136-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1531-
dc.description318-325en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study provides the pattern of colonization and diversity of filamentous fungi on naturally deposited and deliberately introduced Rhizophora mucronata Lamk. wood during monsoon and summer in a mangrove of southwest India and compares overall occurrence with three species co-occurrence. The number of fungi ranged between 1 and 9 per naturally deposited wood and 1 and 8 per deliberately introduced wood. Out of 66 fungi recovered, naturally deposited wood showed higher fungi during monsoon (September, 2000) than summer (March, 2001) (48 vs. 24), so also among 40 fungi on wood showing co-occurrence of three fungi (21 vs. 18). Percent frequency of occurrence of fungi was not significantly different between wood types and seasons in overall occurrence and three species co-occurrence (P > 0.05). Among 17 core-group fungi (≥10 %), Aigialus mangrovei, Cirrenalia pygmea, Lignincola laevis, Lulworthia grandispora, Passeriniella mangrovei, Trichocladium linderi, Tirispora sp., Zalerion maritimum and Z. varium were highly dominant (≥20 %). On wood showing co-occurrence of three fungi, A. mangrovei, Cirrenalia tropicalis, L. grandispora and T. linderi were highly dominant core-group fungi. Even though A. mangrovei, C. pygmea, C. tropicalis, Halosarpheia cincinnatula, L. grandispora, P. mangrovei, Verruculina enalia and Z. maritimum are typical marine or mangrove fungi, they were core-group fungi on deliberately introduced wood in monsoon season indicates their high colonization activity on wood even under low salinity. Several terrestrial mitosporic fungi (Alternaria, Arthrobotrys, Aspergillus, Penicillium, Phoma and Tetracrium) were found particularly in monsoon season, but none of them belonged to core-group. Irrespective of wood types, overall fungal diversity and richness was highest in monsoon than in summer samples, while in wood showing co-occurrence of three fungi, it was high in naturally introduced wood of summer and deliberately introduced wood of monsoon. Issues related to core-group fungi, seasonal dominance, diversity and co-occurrence have been discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCSIRen_US
dc.sourceIJMS Vol.35(4) [December 2006]en_US
dc.subjectMangroveen_US
dc.subjectWoody litteren_US
dc.subjectRhizophora mucronataen_US
dc.subjectFilamentous fungien_US
dc.subjectDiversityen_US
dc.subjectco-occurrenceen_US
dc.subjectMonsoonen_US
dc.subjectSummeren_US
dc.titleFungal diversity on mangrove woody litter Rhizophora mucronata (Rhizophoraceae)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
Appears in Collections: IJMS Vol.35(4) [December 2006]

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