Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://nopr.niscair.res.in/handle/123456789/14398
Title: <span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family: "Times New Roman";mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-bidi-font-family: Mangal;mso-ansi-language:EN-GB;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language: HI" lang="EN-GB">Traditional <i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal">Lepcha</i> craft <i>Sumok-thyaktuk</i> (<i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal">Lepcha</i> Hat) and its conservation in Dzongu Tribal Reserved Area (DTRA), Sikkim, India</span>
Authors: Lepcha, S R
Gurung, R
Arrawatia, M L
Keywords: Sumok-thyaktuk
Lepcha
Dzongu
Chogyal
Issue Date: Jul-2012
Publisher: NISCAIR-CSIR, India
Series/Report no.: Int.Cl.<sup>8</sup>:A45C 3/00, B25H 3/00, A47B 43/00, A47B 81/00, B25H 3/04, A47
Abstract: <span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family: " times="" new="" roman";mso-fareast-font-family:"times="" roman";mso-bidi-font-family:="" mangal;mso-ansi-language:en-gb;mso-fareast-language:en-us;mso-bidi-language:="" hi"="" lang="EN-GB">The <i>Sumok thyaktuk</i> or Lepcha traditional hat is an oldest form of craft, unique and exclusive to the Lepcha tribe living in the Dzongu Tribal Reserve Area (DTRA) of Sikkim. The hat is intricately woven with the <i>Ru</i> or cane (<i>Calamus acanthospathus</i>), <i>Po-young</i> <span style="font-size: 11.0pt;font-family:" times="" new="" roman";mso-fareast-font-family:"times="" roman";="" mso-bidi-font-family:mangal;mso-ansi-language:en-in;mso-fareast-language:en-us;="" mso-bidi-language:hi"="">–<span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:" times="" new="" roman";mso-fareast-font-family:"times="" roman";="" mso-bidi-font-family:mangal;mso-ansi-language:en-gb;mso-fareast-language:en-us;="" mso-bidi-language:hi"="" lang="EN-GB"> local bamboo (<i>Cephalostachyum capitatum</i>)<i>. </i>Each<i> </i>part of the hat and its artistic design hold its own traditional meaning and significance. The hat formed the headgear of the royal soldiers later on Sikkim Guard during the regime of Chogyal dynasty in Sikkim. Wearing the head gear in marriage ceremony, worships and other festivals is mandatory in the tribe. With the advent of other modern day<span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:" times="" new="" roman";mso-fareast-font-family:"times="" roman";="" mso-bidi-font-family:mangal;mso-ansi-language:en-in;mso-fareast-language:en-us;="" mso-bidi-language:hi"="">’<span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:" times="" new="" roman";mso-fareast-font-family:"times="" roman";="" mso-bidi-font-family:mangal;mso-ansi-language:en-gb;mso-fareast-language:en-us;="" mso-bidi-language:hi"="" lang="EN-GB">s trendy outfits in the locality, these traditional head gear is now facing serious threat and is actually in the verge of extinction.<i> </i>Therefore, the present study is an attempt to study the detail work of art and to document them systematically for the conservation of this dying art.</span></span></span></span></span>
Description: 537-541
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/14398
ISSN: 0975-1068 (Online); 0972-5938 (Print)
Appears in Collections:IJTK Vol.11(3) [July 2012]

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