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IJEB Vol.48(10) [October 2010] >


Title: Biological responses of mobile phone frequency exposure
Authors: Behari, Jitendra
Keywords: Electromagnetic fields
Health effects
Mobile phone
Issue Date: Oct-2010
Publisher: NISCAIR-CSIR, India
Abstract: Existence of low level electromagnetic fields in the environment has been known since antiquity and their biological implications are noted for several decades. As such dosimetry of such field parameters and their emissions from various sources of mass utilization has been a subject of constant concern. Recent advancement in mobile communications has also drawn attention to their biological effects. Hand held children and adults alike generally use mobile sources as cordless phones in various positions with respect to the body. Further, an increasing number of mobile communication base stations have led to wide ranging concern about possible health effects of radiofrequency emissions. There are two distinct possibilities by which health could be affected as a result of radio frequency field exposure. These are thermal effects caused by holding mobile phones close to the body and extended conversations over a long period of time. Secondly, there could be possibly non thermal effects from both phones and base stations whereby the affects could also be cumulative. Some people may be adversely affected by the environmental impact of mobile phone base stations situated near their homes, schools or any other place. In addition to mobile phones, appliances like microwave oven etc are also in increasing use. Apart from the controversy over the possible health effects due to the non-thermal effect of electromagnetic fields the electromagnetic interaction of portable radio waves with human head needs to be quantitatively evaluated. Relating to this is the criteria of safe exposure to the population at large. While a lot of efforts have gone into resolving the issue, a clear picture has yet to emerge. Recent advances and the problems relating to the safety criteria are discussed.
Page(s): 959-981
CC License:  CC Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 India
ISSN: 0975-1009 (Online); 0019-5189 (Print)
Source:IJEB Vol.48(10) [October 2010]

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